For your safety, natural gas smells like rotten eggs.

 An odourant, called mercaptan, is added to natural gas to make even the smallest leak easy to smell. If you notice a smell similar to rotten eggs indors or out, here’s what you need to do:

 

Whenever you suspect gas:

         Don’t use phones, cameras or other electronics near the gas leak.

         Leave electrical switches, appliances and computers as they are.

         Don’t smoke or use lighters or matches.

         Don’t start ay motors or motor vehicles near the gas leak.

         If escaping natural gas is burning, call your local fire department.

         Don’t attempt to put the fire out yourself.

If you suspect gas indoors:

         Open doors and windows to let the gas out and fresh air in.

         Go outside. From a safe distance, use your cell phone or a neighbor’s phone to call the Enbridge Gas Distribution – Emergency Number is 1-866-763-5427

         If you can hear a “hissing” sound, leave the building immediately. Leave doors and windows open. As soon as you’re well away from the gas leak, call the Enbridge Gas Distribution – Emergency Number is 1-866-763-5427

If you suspect gas outdoors:

         Put out all open flames such as torches, campfires and barbecues.

         Leave the area and from a safe distance call the Enbridge Gas Distribution – Emergency Number is 1-866-763-5427 from your cell phone or a neighbor’s phone

         Stay clear of the area.

         Keep doors and windows closed to prevent gas from going inside.

 

Other ways to detect Natural gas

While in most cases gas leaks can be detected by smell, it is important that we don’t rely on our sense of smell alone. Any of the following signs ear your natural gas meter, appliances or pipes ma also indicate there is a natural gas leak:

         A damaged connection

         A hissing sound

         Dead or dying vegetation only in that area.

 

As an extra line of defence, many stores now offer methane alarms that are designed to detect natural gas. Be sure that any safety equipment you purchase is certified by the Canadian Standards Association.

 

More Information on natural gas safety can be found at enbridgegas.com under “about natural gas”.